Thursday, March 30, 2017

Fixing Sydney by Diane Zparkki



Young Adult Romantic Suspense
Date Published:  August 1 2016



Sydney Sommer’s world fell apart after senior prom. Since then, her life had become a constant loop of unfortunate scenarios that kept her in constant fear of what might be lurking around the next corner. Her trust in others was at a standstill. Even those who were closest to her were held at a distance.
After serving active duty overseas, Jaxon Triggs moved away from his hometown, hoping the change in scenery would help him build a new future for himself. What he wasn’t expecting was to fall for a girl who was broken.
From the first moment Jaxon laid eyes on Sydney, he was curious. He became determined to do everything he could to break through the armor Sydney held around her so securely. His instinct to protect her and keep her safe kicked in as the dangers she encountered became more personal.
With dread always looming close by and secrets discovered, would Sydney be able to handle the new changes in her life yet heal at the same time?




Diane Zparkki——lives in the greater Toronto area. She is a working mom, and with her husband, she has raised three great kids. She is a thrill seeker who usually drags her family along with her.
She was never a big reader or writer in her youth—Coles Notes were her best friend through college. Her enthusiasm for reading came later in life when she joined a book club. She loved those books, but she wanted raw, simple, and happily ever after with a bit of get down and dirty. That was when her love for bad boys on a Harley was set in motion.
After reading so many books, her mind started to create her first story, and she needed to get it out.
Fixing Sydney of the Branson’s Kind of Love trilogy is her first book, and she hopes you enjoy it as much as she has enjoyed having these characters running around in her head.


Contact Information
Twitter: @dianezparkki
Pinterest: diane zparkki



Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/2mWYL4n


A Day in the Life of Author Diane Zparkki

Writing is not my full time job, oh how I wish it was. My day begins like most working moms with my alarm clock being programmed to go off at six thirty with the sweet sound of “Free” by Zac Brown Band. Now that does not necessarily mean that I get up. I head up rolling out of bed about fifteen minutes later and and get myself ready for the day. By seven thirty I am heading downstairs but not before I flip the lights on in my son’s room while his own alarm is blaring to his own sound, and it is no Zac Brown tune.
I make my way down to the kitchen to get breakfast ready and make lunches. Loving that next year my son will be in high school and he will have to make his own lunch.
At eight o’clock I am final sitting down to eat my breakfast and will either go through my emails and do correspondence or I will read for half hour before I have to leave for work.
But of course during the midst of this morning kitchen routine I have hollered up to my son about a dozen times to make sure he is up and getting ready.  I wonder how I once did this with three kids in the house (my two daughters are at university now).
I am at work ready to start my day by eight forty- five. I spend my day at an elementary school where the autistic students are integrated into the regular class with support for an educational resource worker, me. The job is consuming because I often try to think outside the box to teach and also help the classroom teacher with the curriculum they need to have in place for these students. Some days can be challenging to say the least, but on those days when things go smoothly and my students get it. It’s an absolutely rewarding day.
My lunch breaks are spent in a quiet room were I can run away with my characters and write their story. In fact, my computer is usually with me where ever I go. As I am writing this I am sitting a speed training program my son is involved in for an hour. I could easily leave and go for a coffee or go shopping but my character is always hanging out with me demanding to be heard.
I thank my lucky stars that my husband loves cooking because he makes dinner most nights.

After dinner I get myself settled down with a cup of tea, fuzzy socks, and my pajamas to sit down at my computer to write. I close down the computer at around eight thirty and do one of two things: climb into bed and read whatever book I am reading or head down to the family room and watch two or three episodes of whatever Netflix obsession I am on. My eyes usually close around midnight where my characters decide to take over my subconscious.